The pages in this section show how we work to help people change and break the cycle of crime.

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Find out more about how we work with people to reduce re-offending.

Community Order changes

Community Order changes

Changes to the Offender Rehabilitation Act on February 1, 2015 mean that everyone who is sentenced to less than 12 months in custody will come out of prison on licence plus supervision for 12 months from the day of release. The majority will be supervised by TV-CRC (a small number who are a high risk of harm to the public will be supervised by the National Probation Service).

Rehabilitation Activities

Rehabilitation Activities

The new Rehabilitation Activity Requirement (RAR), introduced on February 1, 2015, replaces the Specified Activities Requirement and Supervision Requirement. The change took place as an update to the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act and aims to be more targeted to people's offending behaviour. The RAR activities we offer in Thames Valley include Restorative Justice, MARA (Managing Alcohol Related Aggression), ETE (Employment, Training and Education) and Thinking Ahead for Women.

Post-custody Licences

Post-custody Licences

Supervising and managing people released from prison on licence is an important aspect of our work. It helps us to ensure that people access the right help and support needed to keep out of trouble and on the right side of the law. We can work with people to help them recognise their own potential, gain skills and identify ways to be constructive members of their community.

Education, Training & Employment

Education, Training & Employment

Having a job is key to reducing the chance of someone re-offending. At TV-CRC, we offer bespoke education, training and employment advice and structured sessions to help people get back into long-term employment.
The struggle some people have in getting a job after committing a crime (and paying the consequences) can mean that they often make excellent employees - showing appreciation for being giving a second chance.

Community Payback

Unpaid Work is a sentence available to courts. It is intended as a punishment and also as a means by which offenders can make amends to the community for the harm they have caused. It’s known as Community Payback.

The sentence is set by the court at anything between 40 and 300 hours depending on the seriousness of the crime and the offender’s record. In Thames Valley offenders must work at least seven hours – or one full day – per week, either as part of a group or on a single placement. They will work more intensively if they are unemployed.

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